Yes Indeed

In a significant step toward breaking down discriminatory barriers that exclude unemployed workers from being considered for jobs, the website Indeed.com has announced it will no longer post job ads that discriminate against unemployed workers.

A company spokesperson confirmed late yesterday that Indeed.com has "implemented measures to block ads identified as discriminating against the unemployed" from being posted.

Indeed’s Director of Communications, Sophie Beaurpere, issued the following statement:

“Indeed.com strives to provide the best job search experience for job seekers.  Our policy is to exclude job listings that do not comply with federal or local laws related to discriminatory hiring practices as well as job listings that discriminate against the unemployed.”

By acknowledging the issue, and taking steps to block ads from their site that exclude unemployed job-seekers, Indeed.com is showing that businesses can and should do the right thing by unemployed workers and the nation's economy -- helping to keep the doors of opportunity open to qualified applicants regardless of current employment status.  Kudos to Indeed.com for stepping up voluntarily to act responsibly on this issue.

News of Indeed's decision was first reported by Change.org.  Change.org has been promoting an online petition submitted by unemployed worker activist Kelly Wiedemer urging job sites to refuse ad postings that discriminate against jobless workers.  The group USAction had earlier launched a similar petition campaign, and the two online efforts now have more than 160,000 signers.  Now the online community at ColorofChange.org has a letter that readers can sign calling on Monster.com to do the right thing and ban discriminatory job postings as well.

Opposition to these discriminatory practices has been growing as Unemployedworkers.org and the National Employment Law Project have led the way in exposing the problem, an effort that really gained momentum with an EEOC hearing early this year, and the recent introduction of legislation to ban these practices in both the U.S. House and the Senate.  And support continues to build for that legislation, as television news coverage of an event held by Senator Sherrod Brown (D-OH) to highlight the issue showed yesterday.

But, until such legislation becomes law, employers, staffing firms, recruiters and other job sites should follow the example set by Indeed.com and take steps to end these harmful discriminatory practices.

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